5 reasons why the Brooklyn Nets lost Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals to the Milwaukee Bucks | NBA Playoffs 2021

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The Brooklyn Nets came close to clinching a spot in the Eastern Conference Finals for the 2021 NBA Playoffs, but fell short in Game 7 against the Milwaukee Bucks. Even after forcing overtime, the Nets fell 111-115, marking one of their most depressing losses in the playoffs thus far.

The Milwaukee Bucks ended the Brooklyn Nets’ unbeaten home record in the 2021 NBA playoffs with the victory. It was also a night to remember, as the Bucks won their first Game 7 on the road in franchise history.

Early in the game, Bruce Brown’s return to the starting lineup paid off handsomely, as he set hard screens for Kevin Durant. Brown finished the first half with eleven points and three assists. The Brooklyn Nets, on the other hand, slowed down as they relied solely on Kevin Durant for productivity.

Khris Middleton has struggled on the road in this series and continued to do so in the first half, going 2 of 11 for the game. He did, though, turn things around in the second. Middleton redeemed himself late in overtime by making the shot that gave the Milwaukee Bucks the lead.

Both teams registered 20 lead changes. But the Brooklyn Nets super team failed to close out the game despite holding the lead with one minute left on the clock.

On that note, let’s take a look at five reasons why the Brooklyn Nets lost against the Milwaukee Bucks in Game 7 of their Eastern Conference Semi-finals.

#1 The Brooklyn Nets were dominated by the Milwaukee Bucks on the offensive glass

Brook Lopez (11) of the Milwaukee Bucks grabs a rebound of Bruce Brown (#1) of the Brooklyn Nets.
Brook Lopez (11) of the Milwaukee Bucks grabs a rebound of Bruce Brown (#1) of the Brooklyn Nets.

It is unclear why Steve Nash left DeAndre Jordan on the bench throughout the series and decided to play small. The Brooklyn Nets were punished for that by the Milwaukee Bucks and were dominated in the paint.

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